The Burmese Brown Mountain (Manouria Emys Emys)

Range- Southeast Asia. from Eastern India all the way down to Borneo and Sumatra. Habitat- Burmese Mountains are a forest-floor dweller in the very humid and wet rainforest in southeast Asia. This species is one of the only tortoise species that creates a nest and guards it from predators. The Burmese Mountain tortoise utilizes fallen twigs, leaves, and dirt debris on the forest floor to create the nest to lay its eggs in. Diet- Forages on fallen fruits, leaves, carrion, and will eat numerous species of low-dwelling plants on the forest floor. Snails, worms, some decaying animals. Banana trees, elephant ear species, pothos species, some variety of bamboos. Size- Burmese Browns get quite large reaching 18+ inches in straight length, and weighing upwards of 100 pounds. Conservation- Burmese Browns are Listed in CITES Appendix II. Due to over-export of this species for pet trade, medicinal usage in Asian nations, and religious worship by local monks the Burmese mountain, the Burmese Brown wild population numbers is suffering and it is currently a protected species in its native lands.

Our Burmese Mountain Tortoise named “Little Papa”

Range – Southeast Asia. from Eastern India all the way down to Borneo and Sumatra.

Habitat – Burmese Mountains are a forest-floor dweller in the very humid and wet rain forest in Southeast Asia. This species is one of the only tortoise species that creates a nest and guards it from predators. The Burmese Mountain tortoise utilizes fallen twigs, leaves, and dirt debris on the forest floor to create the nest to lay its eggs.

Diet – This tortoise forages on fallen fruits, leaves, carrion, and will eat numerous species of low-dwelling plants on the forest floor. It will also hunt for snails, worms, and some decaying animals. Banana trees, the elephant ear plant species, pothos, and some variety of bamboos are favored by the Burmese Mountains.

Size – Burmese Browns get quite large, reaching 18+ inches in length, and weighing upwards of 100 pounds.

Conservation – Burmese Browns are listed in CITES Appendix II. Due to over-exportation of this species for the pet trade, medicinal usage in Asian nations, and for religious worship by local monks, the Burmese Brown wild population numbers is suffering, and is now considered a protected species in its native land.

Female Top. Male Bottom. Burmese Brown Mountain (Manouria Emys Emys)

Female Top. Male Bottom. Burmese Brown Mountain (Manouria Emys Emys)

 

 

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